Good Shepherd, Judge, and Savior

Good Shepherd, Judge, and Savior

“By this is love perfected with us, so that we may have confidence for the day of judgment, because as he is so also are we in this world.” -1 John 4:17

Check out last week’s sermon here.

Question: Why does John want us to consider now the day of judgment?

When I was younger, I remember, seeing paintings of Jesus gracing wood paneled walls in the homes of many folk. In these paintings, Jesus is portrayed sitting in the countryside, with shepherds crook in hand, gently holding a lamb. He gazes upon that lamb with tender smile; the lamb looks back upon Jesus. The image is a helpful reminder of Christ’s care and the parable of the Good Shepherd who leaves the ninety-nine to save our one lost, sheepish selves.

There are many helpful renderings of Jesus as shepherd and caregiver, but I have never in my life walked into a home and seen hanging an image of Christ on a throne of judgment, separating the lost from the saved with the words, “Depart from me!” and “I never knew you” (See Matthew 7:21-23, 25:31-46).

Jesus certainly spoke more of himself as Judge than Shepherd, so why so few images of Jesus the Judge?

There are probably several reasons. I think one is a misunderstanding of what the judgment says about God and means for Christians.

1. Judgment Means God is Holy
The holiness (absolute purity) of God demands justice. Trust me, you want God to be fair with you. If God is not fair, then He is not worthy of your trust. The holiness of God demands a reckoning. The reckoning is demanded when Scripture affirms that some will reject and rebel against the Holy God. Jesus said, “The one who rejects me and does not receive my words has a judge; the word that I have spoken will judge him on the last day” (John 12:48).

The root of all sin and reason for the Judgement is mankind’s rebellion against the Holy God. You don’t look at look pornography just because you feel like it. You commit that and any sin when you believe that your choices and actions are more valuable than the commands God demands of you.

“You shall be holy, for I [God] am holy.” (1 Peter 1:16). The holiness of God demands that all peoples surrender themselves to His superiority. To sin is to reject God’s commands—to reject God. To reject Jesus is to reject God and His superiority. Therefore, judgment comes to right the wrongs of rejecting Jesus—of rejecting God.

2. Confidence at the Judgment Means Christ has Done His Work
The state of your sin will lead to a great and final reckoning. Judgment implies that your sin means something to God. Nothing you have done or will do in life is inconsequential to God. No one will slip through the cracks quietly. God, who sees all, will be judge in Jesus Christ. The Faithful One will punish the faithless. His judgment will provide a correction—the cost for each rejection will be one life (2 Timothy 2:13, Mark 8:35).

This coming judgment puts in proper perspective the work of Jesus on the cross. If judgment is a correction of sin, then confidence at this judgment will only truly be found in Christ who has done a great work. Judgment is the ultimate final correction of sin. The cross is the ultimate payment for sin—the offer of a new life at the cost of Christ’s.

“Since, therefore, we have now been justified by [Jesus’] blood, much more shall we be saved by him from the wrath of God.” -Romans 5:9

Understanding the terrifying, correcting judgment with the cross as the ultimate payment for your sin, John calls Christians to have confidence, not fear in the face of coming judgment.

Last Sunday Pastor Mike saw in 1 John 4:13-21 three rivers of assurance – 1) the Holy Spirit, 2) the confession of Jesus as God and Savior, and 3) abiding in love – that flow into a reservoir of confidence when we consider the coming judgment.

The bedrock of all these rivers to confidence is and will always be the initiating, saving love of God in Christ for sinners deserving judgment.

“We love because he first loved us.” – 1 John 4:19

So, when you look to update your wall art, or to just ponder the dimensions of Christ, next to, “Christ the Shepherd,” place on your wall – and more importantly, in your heart – the image of “Christ the Judge.” Let the coming judgment fill you with deeper gratitude for the depth of the work of Christ, and drive you to sincere love coming from the depth of the love of God for you in Christ.

Question: Why does John want us to consider now the day of judgment?
Answer: I think John wants us to consider the judgment now, so that we will have a greater appreciation, now, for the love of God in Christ Jesus leading us to real love for others.

What I Learned Last Sunday