What Song am I Singing?

What Song am I Singing?

Though the fig tree should not blossom,
nor fruit be on the vines,
the produce of the olive fail
and the fields yield no food,
the flock be cut off from the fold
and there be no herd in the stalls,
yet I will rejoice in the Lord;
I will take joy in the God of my salvation. – Habakkuk 3:17-18

Through the last half of the summer, we have been studying Habakkuk, and Pastor Mike ended the series last Sunday. Check out the series here.

Habakkuk led us through many “stanzas,” as Pastor Mike shared Sunday, culminating in chapter 3; it is a song full of worship to God and resolve to rejoice in God though Habakkuk loses everything (Hab 3:17-19). Though all things fall apart, yet God is still my rock.

Though the fig tree should not blossom…
…yet I will rejoice in the Lord;
I will take joy in the God of my salvation. -Habakkuk 3:17-18

This message from Habakkuk’s song is not one of many ways to ‘fix’ your life. The message is of a singular hope that finds all other ‘fixes’ to be frauds. Is the song we are singing, the focus of our hearts, directed toward this singular hope?

Three Applications from Habakkuk’s Song

1. Fill your song with the substance of salvation.

Habakkuk’s song comes from realities about God that he has experienced and bought into. He sees and is confident that God is the victorious Savior.

God came from Teman,
and the Holy One from Mount Paran. Selah
His splendor covered the heavens,
and the earth was full of his praise. – Habakkuk 3:3

You [God] went out for the salvation of your people,
for the salvation of your anointed. – Habakkuk 3:13

Habakkuk has no hope apart from the promised faithfulness of God. If Habakkuk’s song was filled with the hope in his toughness to survive the “thoughs” of life, he is in trouble. We too have no hope apart from the faithfulness of God in Christ. Such songs, without Christ, have no substance and will end in despair. They will not stand the lifetime of “thoughs” that will come.

So we must taste the goodness of God every day. Remember His absolute reliability – past, present, and future. Praise His salvation. This is certainly what Habakkuk has done throughout the book, turn to God in every moment.

2. Make your mixtape in advance (or Spotify playlist (whatever the kids do these days)).

One of the most astounding truths of the book of Habakkuk and his song is that he writes the song before the trouble comes upon his people. God has promised judgment is coming (Habakkuk 1:6) for Israel, but for Habakkuk the judgment has not arrived yet. Many of us tend to tackle events as they arise. Habakkuk does not. He resolves to fight for joy in God before the trial comes. He is like a marathoner setting out the training schedule months away from race day.

We too have grounds from this book to look to any pending event and resolve to find in God joy and life and satisfaction. Be aware, I don’t think this is call to be pessimistic or a bunch of Eeyore Christians.

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, rejoice. – Philippians 4:4

We can both know and believe that there will be trials in life, and live lives of joy.

3. Keep the song on repeat.

Someone in our homegroup Sunday night shared, “Songs aren’t meant to be sung once.” What a helpful reminder for someone struggling to find hope. Filled with weakness, we are in need of new mercies every morning, reminders of who we are in Christ and of how worthy God is of our confidence.

Habakkuk shared the tune of his song to be played again. We too must continually be reminded of God’s faithfulness. The gospel needs to be re-preached to our hearts, remembering the kindness we were shown in Jesus. The faithfulness of God needs to be recounted. We must daily come before God in need and hope, calling out to Him.

Question: Is the song I am singing filled with the resolve to rejoice in the Lord, though trouble comes?

What I Learned Last Sunday