A Good Steward of God’s Grace

A Good Steward of God’s Grace

Some time ago I had the privilege of observing the beauty of God’s grace at my dinner table. As I was cutting up cucumbers and strawberries for salad, shredding meat for sandwiches, I admired the color and the fragrance of his provision and had no idea of another degree of grace I was about to witness. That evening there were two ladies at our dinner – one, with a broken heart, pouring her story out in tumbling words, grotesque images. God’s grace was already at work at her, pulling her to God’s people, shedding light on her darkness, reviving her through God’s
word, working repentance into her soul, breathing hope into her whole being. The other – with a heart broken and healed by that same grace. The same grace has made her firm in the hope, sanctified her, and made her whole and fruitful. The same grace was now in her words of truth, spoken with sincere joy and tenderness: “This doesn’t define you.” “Christ is enough for this.” “There is hope.”

And there I was, with my breath taken away by this beautiful display of God’s glorious grace. Peter’s words: “As each has received a gift, use it to serve one another, as good stewards of God’s varied grace” (1 Peter 4:10) – took on flesh and color.

What is this varied grace? What does it mean to be a good steward of this grace? And what does it have to do with how we relate to each other in the church? I wanted to explore this theme and here is what I came up with from looking in the Word.

God in his pursuit of glory, lavishes his grace on his people by redeeming it for himself through his Son. But Christ’s death and resurrection accomplished far more than just a ticket to heaven! His work continues being the source of “varied” grace of which Peter speaks in his letter. Here are some other facets of grace that we experience daily: This grace sustains believers in their hardships. As they are called to live righteously in this sin-cursed world, they have God’s Spirit’s help in their weakness:

And after you have suffered a little while, the God of all grace, who has called you to his eternal glory in Christ, will himself restore, confirm, strengthen, and establish you. -1 Peter 5:10

There is an enabling grace that empowers believers to serve in the Body of Christ through spiritual gifts: “But grace was given to each one of us according to the measure of Christ’s gift”. When God predestines certain good works for his people to accomplish (Eph. 2:10), he provides everything needed for those works, along with strength to do them (1 Peter 4:10)! There is a sanctifying grace that is at work in believers:

For the grace of God has appeared, bringing salvation for all people, training us to renounce ungodliness and worldly passions, and to live self-controlled, upright, and godly lives in the present age. -Titus 2:10

Believers are free from their old slave master, Sin, and now live under the reign of the new one, Grace (Romans 5:21, 6:1-14).

The key component of all these facets of grace is that it’s available through Christ alone, through faith and dependence alone. All grace is bestowed on us freely, based not on our merit and performance, but on what Christ has done. In other words, there is never a point in my service, sanctification, or suffering, at which I can say: I did this.

Putting it all together, we may say that God lavished upon us the immeasurable riches of his grace in saving us for himself and continues to do so in sustaining us, sanctifying, and enabling us to glorify him with good works. We can say that grace is his kind face and his merciful heart when I turn to him, a helpless sinner; it is his helpful hand when I am serving him; it is his shears as he prunes me for more fruit-bearing; it is his embrace and nearness when I am hurting, and his steady feet that carry me to heaven.

In the light of this, Peter’s words: “Be good stewards of God’s various grace… in order that in everything God may be glorified through Jesus Christ.” (1 Peter 4:10,11) mean that as we receive his gracious gifts of saving and sustaining us, we are called, amid suffering and pressures of the world, to a very specific way of living – to steward, manage, administer his varied, multifaceted grace well. We are called to join God in his gracious activity towards his people in saving, enabling, sustaining and sanctifying it.

As good stewards of God’s saving grace, we are to proclaim and defend the Gospel, “the word of grace that is able to build up and give inheritance among the saints” (Acts 20:31, Philippians 3:1-3). We are to forgive and accept one another as God in Christ forgave us (Ephesians 4:32).

As good stewards of God’s sustaining grace, we can offer our hands and feet, our listening ear and compassionate presence to those who are suffering. We rejoice with those who rejoice when God bestows his grace on them – and weep with those who weep, offering the grace of this kind God, who is near the brokenhearted. We are urged by Paul “to encourage the disheartened, help the weak, be patient with everyone” (1 Thessalonians 5:14b), and carry each other’s burdens (Galatians 6:2).

As good stewards of God’s enabling grace, we can, first, seek to exercise whatever gift we received in serving the needs of the church, so that it grows and matures in love. Various gifts of the Holy Spirit were given with a purpose – to build up the church, so that God may “fill all things with himself” (Ephesians 4:10), and to him would be glory in his church (Ephesians 3:21). And to be a good steward of this enabling grace will also mean teaching and equipping others to use their gifts and live a life of servanthood (Ephesians 4:11,12).

As good stewards of God’s sanctifying grace, we are called to walk in a manner worthy of the Gospel (Ephesians 4:1) and watch that there is no bitter root sprouting in the church (Hebrews 3:12, 12:15). We are to warn those who are idle and disruptive (1 Thessalonians 5:14a). I watched this grace manifested before me, in the food on the table and in the words of my friend, a good steward of God’s grace, and my heart overflowed with praises of this glorious grace – just the way it was meant to be (Ephesians 1:6).

Where have you seen this grace at work in your life? Are you stewarding God’s varied grace well?

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