Loveless Christian? It’s a Contradiction

Loveless Christian? It’s a Contradiction

If I [achieve in my life the greatest outward expressions of the Christian life], but have not love, I gain nothing. – 1 Corinthians 13:1-3 (brackets adding my paraphrase)

The message in 1 Corinthians 13:1-7 of the greater call to love that Pastor Mike shared Sunday shoots straight to the heart of the deepest sin issues in a church and its members. Our expression of love to one another and the world is the best indicator of a Christ follower. Jesus Himself said, “By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.” (John 13:35). In the moments we are unloving, Christ does not shine. Rather, we look just like the world groveling over our own selfish ambitions.

And how we need this, right? We can be just like Corinth as we place such higher value on outward performance or investment in a project that love is lost along the way.

In fact, I think we at times excuse our lack of love when we think of all the “good” we are doing! How backwards is that?

Below are four examples I pray help us reflect and repent.

1. You are totally invested in a project for the church (This can apply to any project or task), You justify being unloving to your spouse when you imagine all the benefit your hard work is leading to. You justify cruelty or shortness with the excuse, “But, I’m working on this for our church.” You claim to want the project to be beneficial and God honoring. Therefore, you convince yourself that you have an excuse to be short with your spouse. “Can’t they realize all the good I am trying to accomplish?” 

In those attitudes and actions, the call to love has become less valuable than the “great” church project you are working on. But, God calls you higher! You are nothing when you accomplish things without love. Your loveless attempt to honor God is counterproductive. For, God is honored most in our love expressed to others for the praise of His glory, not our great projects.

2. Think about your expression of love in daily life. The neighbor asks you for help on their house project for the 1,000th time. You roll your eyes when you get the text. You complain to your spouse about how needy your neighbor is. You slip on your shoes and walk out the door, only making sure to put on your smile just before knocking at your neighbors door.

Outwardly, you look good to your neighbor, but God is not fooled by your loveless heart! 

3. You have a rough day at work. Nothing goes right. Your boss reprimanded you, and that big project you have been working on is not going to meet the deadline. Those circumstances then justify your actions at home. You go around spreading discouragement and impatience. The kids see it. Your spouse sees it, but you label your actions as “stress-related” and now have a free pass to spread your lovelessness through each word, cupboard slam, and glare.

Though, you are truly under the pressures of life, God has not exempted His call for you to love.

4. Finally, say there is a global pandemic. But rather than fearing it, you are irritated by those (especially Christians) who focus “all” their attention on safety and isolation. To remedy and help them, you blast off on social media reminding your circles that cautionary measures are signs of a lack of faith in God. You call cautious people cowards. You proclaim that anyone who does not hold your specific view on the nature of the pandemic is giving in to fear mongering. And you boldly scoff, “I will not wear a mask!” 

There may be some truth in the things you said in your post, but God was not fooled by your unloving expression.

God, help us be truly, genuinely loving!

I pray that this message and meditation on the higher call of love in 1 Corinthians 13 will cause deep, enduring clinging to Christ. Let us not be defiant if there is unloving behavior that only sweet Gospel can transform.

What I Learned Last Sunday